=-098 =~ Archer's Quiver DIY – Wood&Faulk
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Archer's Quiver DIY

posted by Matt Pierce on August 20, 2013

I took up archery not too long ago and realized it can be super relaxing when things get stressful. The bad news is, I’ve been pretty busy in the shop and haven’t shot much lately. However with all this shop time, I have been working on a quiver. When I finally do make it out to the range again, I won’t have to carry my arrows in a rubber band.

Please note that W&F DIYs are for personal projects only and no rights granted for commercial use.

You’ll need some tools:

  • sewing machine
  • leather punch
  • rotary knife
  • ruler
  • cutting mat
  • rivet setting tools

You’ll need a few materials:

  • 8oz. strap leather
  • heavy canvas (vintage army tent here)
  • 5oz. garment leather
  • copper rivets

Here’s the instructions to make one for yourself. Like all my experiments on here, there’s lots of ways to do this, and modifications for your own use too. My plan went like this:

Start by cutting your main material into three parts for the body. Two pieces 6”x26” and one pocket piece at 6”x12”. Cut a piece of leather or other thicker material for the bottom at a dimension of 6”x7.5”.

Lay the pocket piece flipped and reversed onto one of the body panels and sew the bottom of the pocket to the body. Then flip the panel over into place. I added a top-stitch on as well to match the original army tent material's construction. Sew your leather bottom panel to the bottom of the first body panel, and then the other size to the second body panel. I used tape to align panels before sewing. You can use double-sized tape too, if you want them stuck in place.

After all the panels are together, fold the panels in half, inside-out. Make sure your pocket is in the correct place and then clip or pin everything together. Sew down the side seams, stopping 2.5 inches from going all the way to the leather bottom. While still inside-out, make a tube and push the leather bottom seam to spread the open area and flatten and then sew a stitch perpendicular to the side seam. After sewn, cut the extra material off.

Last steps are to attach hardware to the quiver body. I used copper rivets, leather bits a d-ring and a small buckle to make strap attachment points. Where it attaches to the opening, I folded the end of the strap over, with a d-ring in the fold for extra utility. My strap is adjustable with the buckle at the other end, either hang on my belt loop when I’m shooting or over my shoulder when walking to the range.

Wood&Faulk DIY guides are supplied for private use only and not for commercial use. Copyright Wood&Faulk 2015